Posted on

Book Review Fussy Cutters’ Club by Angie Wilson

Book Review Fussy Cutters’ Club by Angie Wilson, softback published by C&T Publishing (Stash Books). ISBN 978-1617454462, price 23.99 available from www.searchpress.com Also available as an ebook

I must say first of all, that I am not a fussy cutter, yet I do admire those perfect cuts, arranged to feature the fabric. It is extreme fabric play. The book includes the basics, tools, suitable fabric guide, tutorials, colour, cutting, piecing and finishing. Tutorials include EPP, cutting to make a new repeat and other how-to’s. There are 14 projects to ensure you get to grips with fussy cutting. It’s all about the placement of the print within the design of the quilt. So you would cut out the motifs from the background print. Great projects include a nine-patch pot holder, coasters, pincushion, pouch, cushion (pillow), mini quilts and other quilts, table runner, place mats and totes using different techniques. The clear instructions are accompanied by excellent photos and line drawings. It did not set my world on fire, some of the colours and fabrics were off-putting but it is a good introduction to the techniques of fussy cutting and that’s what matters.

Posted on

Colouring Fabric for Quilt Design How-To Colour With Markal Sticks

Colouring fabric is one way to be original in your designs and to create original motifs. It is a way of making marks. When it comes to colouring fabric, it seems to baffle people, as there are so many products to choose from.

Choose a marker or colouring medium designed for fabric.
Test it on your fabric following instructions and wash it. Dry and see what happens. Does it fade? does it run?
What do you have to do to make the medium permanent?

Markal painsticks are a favourite of mine:
1. Great artistic colour range
2. Inexpensive compared to other mediums
3. Nothing is needed to work with them, no gel, textile medium, not even water
4. Easy to use
5. Easy blending, there is also a blender marker
6. Minimum wastage – some of these sticks had been used before, and I made approx 50 oak leaves and you can see how little I used
7. Cure for at least 3-5 days then heat set
8. Pigment based and permanent

All you need is a stiff brush (the kind you would use with stencils). Draw your motif onto your fabric (I usually use a chalk pen). Wearing protective gloves, peel back the hardened layer on the painstick. Collect the peelings carefully, onto a paper towel – they will mark anything they fall onto if trodden in. Brush a little colour onto your brush and apply to the fabric. You can also use stencils. When not in use the painsticks harden over again. They go a long long way.

The simplest and best way to colour fabric. This is how I created the oak leaves on my quilt. Make sure you do not move your fabric with your messy hand! Brushes wash out with hot water and soap.

For more on colouring fabric, join the design ecourse by clicking this link

Words and images copyright Karen Platt 2018