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Types of Quilt Wadding Batty About Batting

Types of quilt wadding – so many these days but they all have different purposes. Even the Americans and English cannot agree on a name – it’s batting in America and wadding in England. It’s the filling in your quilt sandwich – quilt top (patchwork), wadding, quilt backing.

types of quilt wadding
silk wadding

I really am going batty over batting. All because I decided that my new wearables, my quilted jackets and coats must have natural wadding that was breathable. That narrows the choice down somewhat as you will see.

You might choose your wadding based on many different factors such as price, fibre, environmental considerations, loft (how thick or thin, it does not necessarily equate to more or less warmth) etc. You get what you pay for. Since I am a girl that not only likes a little luxury, but deserves it; I’ll start with

SILK

The height of luxury. It tends to come in two types – if you are lucky enough to get pure silk, grab it with both hands, no matter the cost. It is breathable therefore will keep you cool in summer and relatively warm in winter. It does however seem to be very rare. I bought from The Silk Route some years ago and have now used it all. I am devastated that she no longer stocks it as people do not want to pay. It was very reasonable just 26 pounds and made three jackets. Very thin, easy to quilt. Great for clothing and quilts alike. Drapes well.

types of quilt wadding
top pure silk wadding, bottom pure wool wadding

So this time around I had to settle for Hobbs Premium Silk Blend. It has 10% polyester. Not keen on the look, very smooth and unsilk-like. It is about the same quarter inch thickness (loft) as the pure silk I had. Hope it is as good as they say. Next on my list of must haves is

WOOL

Still quite luxurious but much cheaper than silk, wool wadding again is natural and breathable thereby meeting my two tests for ‘will I like this wadding?’ It will keep you cool in summer and warm in winter, without bulk. Some people say it beards, I have never had that problem. Watch the loft, it can be 1cm thick, which is great for some purposes only. Good for hand quilting and also hand tied quilts. Absorbs moisture without feeling wet.

COTTON

This used to be my go-to when I first started quilting. However it is not environmentally sound, especially when the amount of water used is taken into account. It is not breathable either, so I am not sure why so many of us use it in quilting other than it being reasonably cheap and very available. It is usually thin. It also comes in blends with polyester, but I prefer it on its own. It absorbs moisture and stays wet, it does not wick away moisture like wool.

TIPS

If you want more stability, look for needle-punched.

Look carefully at the wadding and get it the right side round so that you do not push the wadding through your quilt as you go.

BAMBOO

Also often found as blends. Although it is touted as more environmentally friendly than cotton, that is very debatable. As a natural fibre it is breathable, drapes well and absorbs moisture. It is usually low loft. Like wool, it is said to wick away moisture.

POLYESTER

Manmade fibre from plastic that is not breathable and the only quilting that should happen with this abomination is a wall or art quilt if you must not bed or wearables. Available in different loft but it does not drape well. It does not shrink. It can beard. It is best avoided as it is usually not from renewable sources and is the most environmentally unfriendly.

SHRINKAGE

Buy pre-washed if you do not want to wash it. Most non pre-washed will shrink 3-5% on the first wash and some people hate that crinkled look, whilst others love it.

So when you look at different types of quilt wadding, you now know what to look for.

PACKS OR METRES

Wadding is sold either in set sizes in packs such as crib, single, double, king or by the metre. I always prefer to buy by the metre. It’s more economical and you can get really wide widths. It really is worth while shopping around as prices vary hugely.

Make sure when you buy you get the right types of quilt wadding for all your quilt projects. Here are my quilted jackets with silk wadding.

types of quilt wadding
Types of quilt wadding

Tune in next week to see which wadding I used in my quilted coats.

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt 2021

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Quilting Reversible Coats Two Coats In One

Quilting reversible coats is a bit more challenging but you get two coats in one. Using a non traditional lining, you can create coats that give you two different looks.

Every time I made the quilted jackets, a little voice inside my head said ‘make it reversible’. Yet the outer and inner fabric plus quilt wadding does not make this an easy task. Still, I am always up for a challenge.

THE JELLY ROLL QUILTED REVERSIBLE COAT

The jelly roll quilt is now complete as far as patchwork goes. The sleeves are now done with two linings and two outers. This quilted coat is the one that started life as a jelly roll that was made into 4 art quilts. I unpicked those to make a coat. I dislike nylon linings found in commercial coats, so I chose another quilting fabric that was pure cotton. The Morris metallic fabrics are a little heavier than the usual quilting fabrics, but I thought they were too good to hide. So this will definitely be the first time I am quilting reversible coats along with the second on my quilting table

quilting reversible coats
sleeves for the jelly roll quilt

THE HEXAGON QUILTED REVERSIBLE COAT

Unlike the jelly roll quilted coat, this one is all hand stitched. Yet I have finished all the hexagons around the same time. over 100 made in around one month. Good going. Now to sew them all together.

Also unlike the first one, this quilted coat has a plain lining in pure cotton. One of the fabrics from the front of the coat.

I have loved making this, although my hands have sometimes complained.

quilting reversible coats
Just two of the wonderful hexagons

QUILT WADDING

Or batting if you prefer is a matter of choice. Some go for cheap, some for content, others for the environment. There are lots of arguments about it all. My preference is for natural quilt wadding. If you are taking the time to make it, both you and the product deserve the best. All the quilted jackets were made with silk wadding. That seems hard to come by at the moment and it is the most expensive wadding of all. For these two coats I opted for wool, but when it came the wadding has such high loft (1cm) that I thought I would look like Bibendum. More wool and silk are on order. I purchased the Hobbs silk wadding as I could not get the one I used for the quilted jackets.

Tune in next week to see which I choose and how I quilt my two coats.

The ecourse will be available shortly, meanwhile take a look at all the quilting and textiles ecourses I offer here

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt 2021

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Quilted Coats Progress Making Clothes

Quilted coats progress seems slow. I am currently making two quilted coats at once – one machine stitched and one hand stitched. Obviously, the machine stitched version is coming along more quickly and nearing quilting stage.

Hand Stitched Quilted Coat

I imagined this as mid-calf length however, I seem to have hit a stumbling block. Would I wear this as a coat? I love the individual hexagons but I keep asking myself does it look better as a lap quilt or even a wall quilt? I asked Instagram followers and those that commented were in favour of the quilted coat. Still I dither. The background fabric you can see is the lining, the only one I could still buy enough of and not the one I wanted.

quilted coats progress
Quilted coat

The image above is not the final layout as I won’t know where everything fits until I have made the last hexagon. My eye is not seeing this as a coat. If it does end up being a coat, I am now thinking knee length.

quilted coats progress
Fabulous hexagons

Machine Stitched Quilted Coat

Quilted coats progress seems much easier with this jelly roll quilt. Not only has it been a doddle to stitch, I love it. For the lining I chose some William Morris metallic fabric. I am going to make this coat reversible so that I can wear it either way. It makes me think of day and night.

The whole of the outer is complete. The back and front linings are done. All I need do now is the sleeves. I need to shape the sleeves and neckline in order to quilt. I am going for a quilting design that will keep the coat supple and not stiff.

quilted coats progress
Coat outer back
quilted coats progress
Coat lining back

Hand Dyeing

I have been looking through the ecourse I started writing some years ago. I have now been hand dyeing fabrics for many many years and this ecourse is now reaching fruition. Keep tuned with the blog for the launch. See more ecourses here

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt 2021

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Design Decisions For Making and Creating

Design decisions is about the decisions we make along the way when we are making and creating. For me this is a process that follows a particular pattern – research, ideas (at least three), more research, possibilities, elimination, following the one idea to a conclusion. The final make.

With every project there are design decisions and processes to follow. That’s why given a theme, every artist or creator can come up with something different. That’s what makes it so interesting.

Let’s take a look at what I am working on at the moment – two separate quilted things. I call them things at the moment because they might not end up as what I think they are.

Design One

If you have been reading the blog, you are familiar with the fact that I have been making quilted jackets, and now I am moving onto quilted coats. With this first design, the hexagons show off the fabric design, Moda Voysey, to perfection. I am now looking at arrangement.

design decisions for making
Design decision for making – layout

I could lay these hexagons out in lights to darks, or in an alternate arrangement. Or in like fabrics.

design decisions for making
layout

At some point in the design process, an element of doubt often creeps in. Did I make the right choices? Should that have gone there? The overnight test is a wonderful invention! My doubt with this is, as much as I love the fabrics, do I want to wear them in a coat?

Design Two

If you need longer than an overnight test, some perspective can be achieved by waiting for things to fall into place. So I started another design, not only for the reason that Design One is handstitched and therefore slow, but to consider how I felt about those fabrics as a coat.

design decisions for making
coat design two

I am already much further on with this design. Pin onto a design wall if you can. If you have ever wondered why, look at the two photos here. Pinned to the wall gives you a much better impression of where you are really at with design and colour.

design decisions for making
design wall

eCourses

Want to learn more about design? You can join one of my ecourses here. They are written for you to develop your own creative way, not by copying, but by understanding the processes involved. They are all unique and written by me as a fully qualified teacher and practising artist, textile artist and quilter. You can start anytime and receive tutor input. Take a look now.

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt 2021

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Mark Making Computer ecourse for Textiles and Stitch

Mark Making computer ecourse is all about making marks with your computer to use in textiles and stitch. Students who think they cannot draw, will find the perfect solution since the marks are made by computer software. Mark making is the easiest form of drawing but that element of pen and paper or brush and ink or even pencil and pad is completely taken out of the picture. Consequently, there is no drawing at all. At the same time, you will find your mark making confidence with this unique ecourse. Join in the fun, the ecourse is available now, click the link to purchase.

mark making computer ecourse
Mark Making computer ecourse

MARK MAKING FROM PHOTOS

In this fabulous mark making computer ecourse for textiles and stitch, I teach how to make marks using software programs, both free and paid for computer software. Discover how to make marks from your own photos in this Unit, taken from the longer digital ecourse. A variety of photos are given with exercises to follow with how to extract marks in a number of different ways. Find out how to make a repeat pattern from the created marks and more. Undoubtedly, this is of benefit to all textile artists.

You’ll also find a good array of examples of completed work. There are stitch projects to use what you have learned. It’s a new way to look at mark making.

There cannot be an easier introduction into mark making. Create your own unique marks using this ecourse which is written from scratch by myself.

mark making computer ecourse
Mark making

WHY MAKE MARKS?

Mark making is a way of individualising your textile and stitch importantly giving it a ‘signature’ that identifies it as you. In addition, marks add vibrance and interest to your work. Now you can learn mark making online.

mark making computer ecourse
mark making

QUILTING

I continue at the present time with my hexagons and first handmade coat. The lining and wadding have arrived, as a consequence I am going as fast as I can, given it is all hand stitched. Consequently this is going to take some considerable time.

quilting
Hand stitched hexagons

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt 2021

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New Projects Quilting Textiles Stitch and Mark Making

New Projects Quilting Textiles is a showcase for what I have been doing last week and in the weeks to come. This new work will take time to come to fruition but it is always good to start something new. Of course, it is a continuation of all that has gone before, but heading in a new direction. That’s what makes it so exciting.

QUILTING

I’ll begin with the quilting, because I hinted at this last week. Having launched the Quilted Jackets ecourse, I am continuing the Making Clothes Series with Quilted Coats. I made a start on the first project by making hexagons. I managed to make 21 in one week. At that speed, I shall finish the whole hand stitched and quilted coat in around two to three months. The jury is still out on the exact style and length since I am concentrating on getting the hexagons made. Each one is sewn by hand. I am really enjoying my ‘quiet time’ every evening stitching the patchwork and watching it grow before my eyes. Of course, this type of patchwork is perfect for taking outdoors or on a journey as it is totally portable. I am thrilled with the Voysey fabrics and keep pondering on lining fabric for this coat. All the instructions will be in the ecourse.

new projects quilting textiles
new project quilted coat
new ecourse Making Quilted Jackets
the new ecourse cover with FIVE jackets

TEXTILES

Unlike the quilting project, this textile project came out of the blue. It is based on an existing Mark Making ecourse I wrote last year, but this one just concentrates entirely on different ways of Mark Making on the computer. Digital Mark Making explores using the computer for stitched textiles in twelve lessons. This is an underused aspect of digital design. The exercises and samples of work will make you use that software! Apps are useful too. I am really enjoying writing this ecourse.

new projects quilting textiles
digital mark making
new projects quilting textiles
digital mark making for stitch

So you can see that my new Projects Quilting Textiles are keeping me very busy and keeping me on my toes.

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt 2021

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New eCourse Beginners Quilted jackets

New eCourse Beginners Quilted Jackets. Another new launch. This ecourse is aimed at beginners. It will teach you all you need to know about making quilted jackets either by hand or machine. It is illustrated throughout with colour photographs. Learn from home with tutor input if needed.

ecourse beginners quilted jackets
new ecourse

I started my first hand stitched sleeveless jacket in 2018. The final jacket for this ecourse was finished yesterday. I love to handstitch in the evenings, it is so relaxing and passes the time. There is nothing more pleasant than your own handmade clothes.

ecourse beginners quilted jackets
my first hand quilted jacket

What’s Included

This new eCourse Beginners Quilted Jackets includes:

Making your own pattern

Taking Measurements

Getting the Right Fit

Five designs

Quilting Ideas

Finishing

Tips and Techniques

ecourse beginners quilted jackets
ecourse beginners quilted jackets

The ecourse includes two sleeveless jackets, one hand stitched and one machine stitched. A hand stitched jacket and a machine stitched longline sleeveless jacket. A machine stitched indigo jacket. Suggestions for adjusting and altering are given too. So there is lots of scope for making your own clothes. All styles could be hand stitched or machine stitched.

a patchwork quilted jacket
a patchwork quilted jacket

What’s Next?

I am already working on writing the next ecourse, which is another in the Making Clothes series. I am planning a series of coats. This series will also include recycling old coats or fabrics to make something new. I have planned at least four styles.

quilted coat design EPP
quilted coat design EPP

The first coat design is an EPP hexagon coat with the fabulous Moda Voysey fabric. This is growing quite quickly even though it is all hand stitched. I have had the fabric for some time now and it is a pleasure to be sewing it up into something so useful.

Moda Voysey fabric
Moda Voysey fabric

This is a more adventurous ecourse than the first, including more techniques and design work.

Find all the ecourses, including this new one on the website.

The direct link to this ecourse

That’s all for this week, see you next Monday

Words, work and images, copyright Karen Platt 2021

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New Finished Quilted Jacket Quilts to Wear

New finished quilted jacket is my topic for this week. If you are a regular visitor to the blog, you might be thinking ‘Hold on, I thought she was making a quilted tunic.’ As you can see from past posts and the photo below, I was. Right up to the last minute.

I lost count how many times I tried it on and thought the size was ok. However at the last try on, I realised once washed, it might be difficult to get on and off.

I gave it the over night test before I proceeded to make it into a hand quilted jacket.

new finished quilted jacket
new finished quilted tunic

My Favourite Wearable

This new finished quilted jacket is my favourite. Even though I had used my very best silk wadding and took care to trim away from seam edges, I must admit the tunic felt a little like getting into a straight jacket. This feels much more comfortable as a quilted jacket.

It was so easy to change it into a jacket, by just cutting up the centre front and adding binding.

Oops

I almost messed it up. I found enough of the same fabric to go around the bottom edge and up the fronts. Hurrah I thought. I cut it two inches wide, but then decided it was too wide. Not sure why but I thought half would do and worst of all, I cut two pieces before I realised this was not wide enough. Oh dear.

So I had to rummage through scraps. I’m surprised how many blue scraps I still have. Serendipity struck and I found a piece of my hand dyed cotton velvet, which I thought perfect for the neck. So it all worked out well in the end. I love the result and that’s all that matters. Dare I say that I am now wishing for cool weather so that I can wear it?

new finished quilted jacket
new finished quilted jacket

Two More To Go

I have another two more jackets on the go and hopefully the ecourse will be finished then. See all the ecourses here

So take good care until next time

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt

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Quilting Options for Quilts and Quilted Clothes

Quilting Options for quilts is all about the choices we make when finishing a quilt; whether that is a bed quilt, wall quilt or clothes. Our options are simple but include multiple choices. The basic choice is

Hand Quilting

Especially if you have pieced your quilt by hand, you might also opt for hand quilting. You then have two further choices:

Traditional style hand quilting with a rocking motion. You can choose to stick rigidly to competition rules and number of stitches per inch. Alternatively, you can go big stitch.

In this way you can quilt any style finished top from whole quilt to patchwork quilt.

Quilting options for quilts
Quilting Options

Domestic Machine Quilting

Usually the most popular choice these days because it is quicker.

Quilting options for quilts with machine quilting offer a wide variety of choices for the quilter, which tend to fall into categories delineated by the tools used:

  1. Usual foot with or without a marked top and straight line quilting
  2. Usual foot with or without a marked top and gentle wavy quilting
  3. Walking foot with quilting as above in 1 or 2
  4. Ruler work – this is using specialised rulers to quilt
  5. Free motion quilting using a special foot
  6. Decorative stitch

Each category above has many possibilities. At the moment I normally still use 1. or 2. unless I am quilting a large bed quilt, in which case I use 3.

It is amazing how much can be achieved with 1-3 but most would agree that if you can master 5, you’ll enhance your quilt no end.

You can see the options I chose for each of my quilting projects on the website

Quilting A Tunic

This weekend I have begun to stitch my hand stitched patchwork tunic. I am using the octagon shape to quilt my top with the quilting lines crossing in the centre. The kites I shall probably just use straight line stitch down the centre of each one.

I could go for an allover pattern, such as circles or wavy lines but I like to quilt sympathetically with the actual quilt top. This is simple straight line quilting, simply working from point to point of the octagon.

quilting options for quilts
Quilting the tunic sleeves

See you next week

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt 2021

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New quilting ecourses tutorials and kits from Karen Platt

Pleased to add more new quilting ecourses tutorials and kits to my listings on Craft Courses

There is much more on my own website. You can, at any time, see all new quilting ecourses, tutorials, ebooks, the remaining fabrics etc and all my textile work and quilts on my own website I am very eager to sell all the quilts as I want to move house this year. There is nothing quite like a hand made quilt.

Learn online

With my own unique comprehensive range of ecourses, you can learn all you need to know about quilting, from beginner upwards. All at home, in your own time. You can also learn about using software and about textiles. I am a fully qualified, professional and experienced teacher.

Everyone who has learned with me so far has given a 5 star rating. It is my pleasure to share my skills and knowledge and help quilters achieve their potential.

new quilting ecourses tutorials
one of my quilting ecourses Cathedral Windows

New Quilting

My main stitching since the last blog has been my hand stitch tunic. Almost got the sleeves done now. It’s definitely slow stitch. The work on wearable quilted clothes will form a new ecourse.

new quilting ecourses tutorials
English paper piecing tunic

I also undid the quilting that was used as a headboard cover on the bed. That is being re-purposed as a jacket. Probably long-line and sleeveless.

I need to gear up a notch or two with my sewing and writing. I am now concentrating on an Intermediate Quilting eCourse for those who finish the Beginners eCourse and want to carry on learning. This takes beginners to the next step.

It’s been a very cold April here so quilts have been much in need. Until next Monday, that’s all for now. Stay happy and keep quilting.

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt 2021