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New December Product Launches Textiles and Art

New December 2018 sees the launch of new textile and art products. This month has got off with a big bang. It isn’t fireworks. It’s all about what is new in my store.

The latest product was added on 1 December 2018. The art prompts inspiration ecourse This is an excellent way to get creating every day for 12 months for just 60 gbp. You’ll find a dedicated, closed fb group page plus booklets for every month. Lots of ideas to keep you creating throughout the year.

New knitting patterns have just been added to my Ravelry knitting pattern store. Keep checking back because a backlog means I am adding new patterns now. You will not want to miss the newest shawl pattern I have designed.

Those are the latest launches, so what does the rest of December have in store? The latest quilt will be finished and published as a quilting tutorial and pattern. The quilt itself will also be on sale. The next quilt is designed. I am hoping to get that launched this month too – that’s the Winter quilt design.

I shall very shortly be uploading the Winter Inspirations ebook. If you are looking for a Xmas gift for someone creative, this is perfect. Just 7 gbp for enough inspiration to keep you going for years. The Inspiration Churches ebook will be launched too and would also make the perfect gift.

Last of all, I think, I have another two ecourses to launch shortly – Colour for the Quilter (beyond the colour wheel) and Creative Hand Stitching. Check for details on the website.

Don’t forget that there are already many products already on the website – supplies, ebooks and ecourses that make the perfect Xmas gift for all your friends. You can also visit my Etsy store or artfinder store for gifts. I sure could do with the support.

Words, work and images Karen Platt 2018

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Sketchbook Work For Quilting Ideas

Sketchbook work is great for quilting ideas. You can work out blocks, motifs, collage, save templates and all sorts of things in a sketchbook.

The templates and a leaf from my autumn quilt were sitting on my sewing table. Actually I had removed my tool box from the sewing machine because the extension table is attached. Templates and the leaf were in the toolbox tray so as not to lose them.

Then I thought, I should create a little sketchbook to keep these safe and record the quilt. Now, it is best to do this before you make the quilt, not afterwards! However, I had designed it on odd bits of scrap paper and as I went along. I wanted a record of it.

I looked for a spare sketchbook, but alas no. You’ve already seen what I was doing with junk mail envelopes a little while ago – the C5 long ones. I also had quite a few large envelopes, I think they are D-something, anyway slightly larger than A5 paper size. This size would be perfect.

My main aim was to gather together key elements of the design and to save the templates. The centre of the quilt is log-cabin based, a leaf motif and hand stitched hexagons. So these were the elements I wished to record in my sketchbook.

I glued together envelopes for sturdiness and taped them together with washi tape. That wide one with the foxes kept tearing. Hexagons and log cabin designs were created in pencil crayon. Magazine images were cut up as hexagons – this was great fun and gave me an idea for another quilt. On these pages I also created pockets for the templates. I might add more in future – fabric scraps etc from the quilt. I found some thick card to make a cover and bind it all together.

I am now starting another sketchbook for my next new quilt.

You can see the quilt tutorial here and the quilt is for sale here.

Words, work and images Karen Platt 2018

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Quilt Design And Problem Solving

Quilt Design is often about problem solving. It’s about making things fit into the mold or breaking that mold as the case may be.

When designing a quilt there are so many decisions you have to make before you begin. It is an ordered process and a process which can be learned. First decisions boil down to materials:

1. Which fabrics?
2. Which colours?
3. Which sewing thread?
4. Which batting?

I see so many questions on social media – do these fabrics go together? Does this look better than that? Yet there are formulas and guidance for which fabrics to choose and how to put fabrics together. Then you see really beautifully made quilts, but with the wrong colours, or poor fabrics, and even badly stretched ones.

Quilting takes time, so it is best practice to get to grips with the essentials. That does not mean following a colour wheel slavishly. You need to understand colour, in the same way you need to understand fabrics.

Once you have made these basic decisions and applied the rules, you open the door to fabulous design and all its glorious permutations and possibilities. That’s what I love about quilting. If you are just beginning, click this link to join my beginners’ quilting ecourse.

My latest quilt was a not-so-scrappy-scrappy-quilt. I wanted to use leftover scraps from two OBW quilts. I was faced with design choices and decisions at every stage. So I pause now and then and consider design principles and my options and work out the best way forward. That’s what design is all about. Scraps rarely come in uniform sizes and that has to be accommodated. I had some hexagons, rectangles and squares and I had to figure a way to use them all. I did, eventually. I am pleased with the result. Of course, I made more scraps along the way!

Why not learn to design now, the ecourse is available wherever you are, by clicking this link

If you need to see quilting in action, join me on a quilt retreat, workshop or holiday in the U.K., France or India, by clicking this link and scrolling through the pages.

Happy quilting
Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt 2018