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Festival of Quilts 2019 Part 6 More Exhibition Quilts

Festival of Quilts ended just a week ago and it seems like a lifetime ago. What joy the show brings with the biggest display of quilts in the UK and how hard everyone works to make it a success.

This is my final look at the quilts on display, with the makers’ names, so that you can have the pleasure of looking up your favourite makers and finding out more about them. I was prompted to write this series of blogs (it’s taken at least 9 hours to do so) as I felt incensed by all the social media posts that do not acknowledge the quilt maker. It is actually written into copyright law that the moral rights of creators of any art or craft are acknowledged. Despite this, even those that know do not always put the names with the quilts and ignorance has never been an excuse in law. For me it is essential to acknowledge the makers of these beautiful quilts. Some quilts take a long time to make, let’s celebrate the makers and find joy in their work. The quilt belongs to someone and it is common decency to give them their due, their moment in the spotlight.

I took a few photos where I could not read the label, and therefore have not shared. That’s how it should be – either we acknowledge the maker or in accordance with the law we keep the photos for personal reference, we do not share if we are not giving the makers’ names.

Aina Muze in the Eternal Thread exhibition, a quilt that used interesting fabrics. It was actually dated 2009.

Aina Muze
Aina Muze

Jenny Otto and Frances Meredith entered a two-person quilt called ‘Stonefields’ that I thought was sheer delight. There is a bunny in there. I long to make this kind of quilt, it is on my list to design one in the coming year.

Festival of Quilts
Jenny Otto and Frances Meredith

Magdalena Galinska and Agnieszka Wietczak entered ‘Promienie/Rays’ in the same category, which received a highly recommended from the judges. Striking design and colour.

Festival of Quilts
Rays

Tatiana Duffie’s ‘Bauble II’, a modern quilt, was a fabulous blend of immaculate piecing and quilting.

Festival of Quilts
modern quilt

Helen Butcher’s ‘Negative Space?’ was highly commended in the modern section. Soft greys with highlights. A lovely geometric medley.

Festival of Quilts
modern quilt

Sheena Roberts’ beautiful storm at sea quilt. I love this interpretation. Sorry my pic is a bit wonky, I was getting tired. It really stood out.

Sheena Roberts
Sheena Roberts

Lesley Brankin’s ‘Belonging’ was featured in the Guild’s Spotlight @ 40 and epitomises the joy of quilting and a great reason to belong to the Quilter’s Guild – the spirit of friendship.

Festival of Quilts
Lesley Brankin

I would like to finish this series of six blogs by mentioning the Guild’s page and membership. Why not join? It is not expensive and without them we would not have this show, so thank you to everyone involved again and my only question is ‘Why do we have to wait another year?’. Make sure you are at FOQ 2020. So much to see and do.

Words, images copyright Karen Platt, quilts copyright their respective makers.

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Final Thoughts on FOQ 2019 Beautiful Quilts

My final thoughts on FOQ 2019

  1. Terrific displays on quilts of all shapes, sizes, levels so inspiring
  2. Some quilts are better than others – after all this is not a juried show and quilters have different abilities
  3. Some awards seem as baffling as ever and some very deserving quilts get left out
  4. I still believe judges are poor on colour sense
  5. Talking for the first time at the show was fantastic
  6. Jenny Doan is definitely the world’s most famous quilter
  7. Wonderful stands of fabrics etc and if only I could have carried it all home
  8. It makes you spend more than you intend – those two packs of Voysey fat quarters were irresistible
  9. Exhausting but exhilarating. If you were not there, why not?
  10. I want it to last more days and I think we need a spring and winter FOQ, once a year is not enough

Judges comments on my quilt were all that my quilting was average and piecing needs attention. One judge (you get 3) said interesting use of fabrics and circles. (It was those fabrics that caused the problems). One said I did not have enough contrast!!! As you will know if you follow my work or blog, this was not the quilt I intended to enter and a lot of things went wrong. In fact, even though I had paid the entry fee, I almost did not send it in. People’s comments have been very kind. The pattern is available now. Absolutely everything I did in this quilt was new to me. Karen Platt ‘Can’t Find My Way Home’

Karen Platt Quilts
Can’t Find My Way Home Karen Platt

So what did I think was fabulous? Here are some of the ones I loved, and some that were not photographed by many others. Jeltje and Friends, Follow Your Dreams Quilt (although with slight reservations on colour). Price tag 6,000 gbp.

FOQ2019
Jelte and Friends

Nibelungenquilter Group Quilt Anna’s Birthday Roses

FOQ2019
Group quilt

The truly astonishing skill of Sandy Chandler ‘Fusion’

FOQ2019
Amazing quilt

Ditto, amazing skill of Robyn Fahy (Dogwood Daisys)

FOQ 2019
Robyn Fahy

Bowled over by the piecing skills (tiny pieces) Alison Gardiner ‘Who Was Sarah Monument?’

FOQ 2019
Tiny log cabin blocks

Excellent use of colour and fabric making this one of the best bargello quilts I have seen. Maria Cosmos ‘Get With The Flow’

Bargello Quilt
Fantastic Bargello Quilt

Joanne Holomeij ‘Slightly Blue Christmas’. Good design and use of monochrome.

I loved the use of fabric and clever quilting in this pictorial quilt. Beverly Rebelo ‘Cinderella and The Ugly Sister’

FOQ 2019
Cinderella

Interesting concept, I believe the transition between top and bottom needed to be more gradual. It received a Judges’ Choice. Anna Williams ‘Log Cabins In The City’.

FOQ 2019

I am still recovering, so there will be a Part 2.

Words and photos copyright Karen Platt 2019. My design copyright Karen Platt 2019, all other designs and quilts copyright of their respective makers.

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Competition Quilts British Stitch and Quilt Show April 2019

Competition quilts are what so many visitors to shows come to see. This small show with a village atmosphere does not disappoint. There were many competition quilts on show and I just want to share some of them with you.

I am going to start with one of my favourite competition quilts at the show in the Traditional category. It is a ‘Dear Jane’ quilt by Francis Meredith. I wonder what your favourite is? This is so beautiful and the kind of quilt I would want on my bed.

Competition Quilts Dear Jane by Francis Meredith
Francis Meredith

The next one is also a favourite and was so realistic it looked like you could just walk into the church. Applique and some cut-outs. Michael Fitchett was a deserving winner with the Heart of The Midlands Group entry.

competition quilts Michael Fitchett's group entry Heart of The Midlands
Michael Fitchett

This was stunning but it was not lying flat ‘Egyptian Dahlia’ by Alison Francis.

Alison Francis competition quilt 'Egyptian Dahlia'
Alison Francis

‘Autumn Leaves’ are always a good theme and colourway. This was made by Anthea Stokes.

'Autumn Leaves' by Anthea Stokes.
Anthea Stokes

If you like that theme, you might find my own design I created last autumn of interest, it is available as a pattern

The quilt itself is also available for sale and I have another autumn wall hanging quilt kit

Heather Hasthorpe was a winner with a group entry quilt based on baskets. It was long armed.

Heather Hasthorpe
Heather Hasthorpe

Kathy Unwin 'Plastic Ocean
Kathy Unwin

Kathy Unwin’s ‘Plastic Ocean’ above, which I believe was shown at FOQ 2018 and below Susan Brown’s ‘Log-A-Rhythm’, also a winner.

Susan Brown's Log-A-Rhythm
Susan Brown

Michelle Whitby’s ‘Woodland Peaks’ – a masterpiece in quilting.

Woodland Peaks by Michelle Whitby
Michelle Whitby

Last of all here are the quilts in the Miniature category. My own design is the hydrangea blue one. This will shortly be available as a kit.

Join me for the next quilting blog, every Monday. I write about various aspects of design plus anything else that fits in with quilting. copyright Karen Platt 2019

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Inspiration for Quilters Local Landscape

Inspiration for quilters can be found anywhere and everywhere. The local landscape is always an excellent place to start when looking for inspiration for quilters. Your local landscape (unless you live in this location) may be different to mine, but you’ll find the inspiration you need if you just look.

You’ll be looking for inspiring views but also concentrating on shapes. Absolutely anything from the banal to the extraordinary can spark off the imagination. Be prepared to look anew, with fresh eyes and open your mind. If you are stuck for inspiration, take a look at my series of ebooks to get you going.

It is true that I have often wished to live somewhere more inspiring, but really my home city is proving to be full of inspiration, right on my doorstep. Take a look around and see what you can find.

I have already talked about one or two ideas I have had from the local landscape and that it is my wish to concentrate on the River Don. This week I walked further along the Don than ever before. I found the nearest ‘picturesque’ spot to the city centre.

I love all the bridges, most of them are from the 1800s. The ripples on the river. The plants along the riverside. The teams have been working hard to rid the river of invasive species. The trees on this part of the river are beautiful and there is a small nature reserve. Occasionally the route goes back to the road. In one spot, the brightly coloured Spiraea was aflame with orange.

What inspiration did I gather from my walk? I noted down patterns, shapes, reflections, a possible landscape quilt. Flora and fauna. I loved the fresh greens of the new leaves. Colours were gathered and recorded. I also made use of some of the photographs digitally, you can see below.

The wonderful thing about inspiration from a natural habitat such as a river or garden, is that it will change through the seasons. So you can keep returning and recording the changes. Until next time, keep quilting.

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt

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Quilts as an Art Form

art quilt Karen Platt

There are traditional or modern quilts and there are quilts that transcend craft and become art.

“I don’t get it,” he said, “who buys these things? Why would you put a quilt on the wall?”

So I took him along to The Festival of Quilts, and he got the hanging of quilts on walls as decoration, but he is still not convinced about the money side. Isn’t this just a craft that people do when they retire? Aren’t they just given away for free?

As I finished writing the beginners’ quilting ecourse and the quilting design ecourse and all the samples I had to make; I find myself free to follow my own path (more or less) and quilt what I always wanted to quilt.

I have said it before, that I came to quilting because so many friends said my digital art would make great quilts. I have still to use my digital art in that way, but now I am free to explore. Like knitting, quilts stand at the crossroads of art and craft. Original design alone does not make it an art form. Using art and design principles, like those I teach in the ecourses helps to distinguish a quilt as a piece of art. It’s also about breaking the mold of functionality and thinking outside the box.

Making money from any craft or art is never easy, but it is possible. I am hoping to make my mark on the quilting world for my innovative ideas and creative use of this medium.

A quilt artist uses traditional quilt techniques but also employs non-traditional ones such as digital or painting, dyeing or stamping, has a message or something to say. Modern quilting is big business.

You can find inspiration for modern quilting and other textiles in my ebooks

and on my workshops in the U.K., France and India

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt 2018