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Competition Quilts British Stitch and Quilt Show April 2019

Competition quilts are what so many visitors to shows come to see. This small show with a village atmosphere does not disappoint. There were many competition quilts on show and I just want to share some of them with you.

I am going to start with one of my favourite competition quilts at the show in the Traditional category. It is a ‘Dear Jane’ quilt by Francis Meredith. I wonder what your favourite is? This is so beautiful and the kind of quilt I would want on my bed.

Competition Quilts Dear Jane by Francis Meredith
Francis Meredith

The next one is also a favourite and was so realistic it looked like you could just walk into the church. Applique and some cut-outs. Michael Fitchett was a deserving winner with the Heart of The Midlands Group entry.

competition quilts Michael Fitchett's group entry Heart of The Midlands
Michael Fitchett

This was stunning but it was not lying flat ‘Egyptian Dahlia’ by Alison Francis.

Alison Francis competition quilt 'Egyptian Dahlia'
Alison Francis

‘Autumn Leaves’ are always a good theme and colourway. This was made by Anthea Stokes.

'Autumn Leaves' by Anthea Stokes.
Anthea Stokes

If you like that theme, you might find my own design I created last autumn of interest, it is available as a pattern

The quilt itself is also available for sale and I have another autumn wall hanging quilt kit

Heather Hasthorpe was a winner with a group entry quilt based on baskets. It was long armed.

Heather Hasthorpe
Heather Hasthorpe

Kathy Unwin 'Plastic Ocean
Kathy Unwin

Kathy Unwin’s ‘Plastic Ocean’ above, which I believe was shown at FOQ 2018 and below Susan Brown’s ‘Log-A-Rhythm’, also a winner.

Susan Brown's Log-A-Rhythm
Susan Brown

Michelle Whitby’s ‘Woodland Peaks’ – a masterpiece in quilting.

Woodland Peaks by Michelle Whitby
Michelle Whitby

Last of all here are the quilts in the Miniature category. My own design is the hydrangea blue one. This will shortly be available as a kit.

Join me for the next quilting blog, every Monday. I write about various aspects of design plus anything else that fits in with quilting. copyright Karen Platt 2019

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Inspiration for Quilters Local Landscape

Inspiration for quilters can be found anywhere and everywhere. The local landscape is always an excellent place to start when looking for inspiration for quilters. Your local landscape (unless you live in this location) may be different to mine, but you’ll find the inspiration you need if you just look.

You’ll be looking for inspiring views but also concentrating on shapes. Absolutely anything from the banal to the extraordinary can spark off the imagination. Be prepared to look anew, with fresh eyes and open your mind. If you are stuck for inspiration, take a look at my series of ebooks to get you going.

It is true that I have often wished to live somewhere more inspiring, but really my home city is proving to be full of inspiration, right on my doorstep. Take a look around and see what you can find.

I have already talked about one or two ideas I have had from the local landscape and that it is my wish to concentrate on the River Don. This week I walked further along the Don than ever before. I found the nearest ‘picturesque’ spot to the city centre.

I love all the bridges, most of them are from the 1800s. The ripples on the river. The plants along the riverside. The teams have been working hard to rid the river of invasive species. The trees on this part of the river are beautiful and there is a small nature reserve. Occasionally the route goes back to the road. In one spot, the brightly coloured Spiraea was aflame with orange.

What inspiration did I gather from my walk? I noted down patterns, shapes, reflections, a possible landscape quilt. Flora and fauna. I loved the fresh greens of the new leaves. Colours were gathered and recorded. I also made use of some of the photographs digitally, you can see below.

The wonderful thing about inspiration from a natural habitat such as a river or garden, is that it will change through the seasons. So you can keep returning and recording the changes. Until next time, keep quilting.

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt

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Quilts as an Art Form

art quilt Karen Platt

There are traditional or modern quilts and there are quilts that transcend craft and become art.

“I don’t get it,” he said, “who buys these things? Why would you put a quilt on the wall?”

So I took him along to The Festival of Quilts, and he got the hanging of quilts on walls as decoration, but he is still not convinced about the money side. Isn’t this just a craft that people do when they retire? Aren’t they just given away for free?

As I finished writing the beginners’ quilting ecourse and the quilting design ecourse and all the samples I had to make; I find myself free to follow my own path (more or less) and quilt what I always wanted to quilt.

I have said it before, that I came to quilting because so many friends said my digital art would make great quilts. I have still to use my digital art in that way, but now I am free to explore. Like knitting, quilts stand at the crossroads of art and craft. Original design alone does not make it an art form. Using art and design principles, like those I teach in the ecourses helps to distinguish a quilt as a piece of art. It’s also about breaking the mold of functionality and thinking outside the box.

Making money from any craft or art is never easy, but it is possible. I am hoping to make my mark on the quilting world for my innovative ideas and creative use of this medium.

A quilt artist uses traditional quilt techniques but also employs non-traditional ones such as digital or painting, dyeing or stamping, has a message or something to say. Modern quilting is big business.

You can find inspiration for modern quilting and other textiles in my ebooks

and on my workshops in the U.K., France and India

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt 2018