Posted on

How Many Quilts Do You Make In A Week?

There are no prizes but how many quilts do you make in a week? Do you always complete a quilt each week, or does it vary? I take my quilting and other textile work as it comes, when I can I make. I am not sure I remember a week when I got quite so much done.

How many quilts o you make
Butterfly quilt designed by Karen Platt

Cheat’s Sheet

  1. Finish projects off instead of starting anew.
  2. Make smaller projects.
  3. Work in a group to get quilts finished.
  4. Make simple patchwork style quilts that are quick to make.

My Quilt Making Week

QUILTING

I started last Sunday with a possible new quilt design going up on the wall. I was amazed when by Thursday the Butterfly quilt was finished. See the front above.

How Many Quilts Do You Make In A Week
Back of the Butterfly Quilt

In the evenings, I like to handstitch. I had had a tidy up in the sewing room and discovered 5 panels of Cathedral Window Quilting that needed some work on them, so I started on those on Tuesday and finished them on Friday.

Cathedral Windows quilt
Cathedral Windows Quilt designed by Karen Platt

I trimmed off the threads on another Cathedral Window Quilt and decided it was a triptych and not to sew it together. Things were going well. My answer to how many quilts do you make in a week is three quilts completed in one week.

How many quilts do you make
Cathedral Window Triptych designed by Karen Platt

HAND KNITTING

In April I had started a knitwear design. This has taken over a month, but it is finished now. It just needs buttons. Time for a new knitting design.

Hand knitting knitwear design
Cardigan designed and hand knitted by Karen Platt

Project Number 5 This Week

Finally, if I have not already exhausted you, I launched Part Two of Inspiration Travel Tunisia, this is ebook eight in the series. I am now working on Part Three. I created almost 40 new pieces of artwork for this ebook.

Inspiration Travel book Eight Tunisia
Tunisia travel guide and unique artwork

Artist Support Pledge

I joined Artist Support Pledge to support myself and other artists. It is the brainchild of Matthew Burrows on Instagram. Works can be sold for up to 200 pounds each. When an artist has made 1,000 pounds, they pledge to buy another artists work to the value of 200 pounds. So far I have added the following work, but any work on the website around or slightly over 200 pounds I would be willing to sell under the pledge, so if there is something you want please let me know.

LIMITED EDITION OF 100 Prints. Digital High Res Print, numbered and signed. A3 size. 100 pounds each plus p&p.

Digital print
El Djem

High Res Print. 35 pounds each incl. p&p in UK, for elsewhere please check.

Digital Print
Bleeding Heart

One of my embroideries is also available at the reduced price of 200 gbp plus p&p.

hand embroidery artist support pledge
Beauty In Stone Hand Embroidery

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt 2020

Posted on

Photography For Quilters What To Photograph

Photography For Quilters is a wide subject. Basically almost anything goes when using photography for quilters. In this week’s blog I am going to give you some tips of what to photograph and what you can get out of your photographs for quilting. See my Advanced Photoshop techniques ecourse about unique techniques for quilting.

Obviously photography for quilters can include images of any subject, say a flower and use it as is. Or a landscape that you simplify. In this blog, I am going to take you through the walk I did with my camera yesterday afternoon.

I have started a ‘river’ theme. I am working on my local river, looking for ideas for my art, which includes not only quilts but textiles and digital manipulation.

I have done this walk many times, sometimes with the camera, sometimes not. I am actually hoping to see the kingfishers and herons that are often on this part of the river. So far one flash of heron a long time ago.

Come walk with me. This bit of the river is very close to the city centre. On my way to the river, I pass the Kelham Island museum and the remains of the rolling mills, which I showed you a few weeks ago. I have decided this will be one of my quilts. In my image, I have a basic shape.

Photo 2 is looking down the river to Kelham Island. I have already created a few years ago, digital manipulations of this, that one day I might make into quilts. I also love the Bessemer converter, texture is something I like to include in my work.

I am loving the reflection in the glass of the bridge, I am sure I can work with this image in terms of repeated pattern.

Lady’s bridge is the oldest bridge. As a landscape it does not offer me much, but sometimes you have to be prepared to use more than one photo and apply a little artistic licence.

The Church and Mill again I have already used as digital manipulations and am hoping to turn those into quilts too.

This stone bridge has an interesting detail. Details can be used in quilts to add a personal touch.

There is always a new view. I did not even know there was a rusty old bridge there. Rust is something I love and I have lots of bits of rusted fabric that I hand dyed to make a wall quilt.

So my half hour or so has produced so much inspiration, I shall need an army of quilters to help.

Words work and images copyright Karen Platt 2019