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Quilting Mitred Corners Binding with Four Strips – Free Tutorial

Quilting Mitred Corners

I have just finished another quilt by quilting mitred corners. You might believe the quilting myth that mitred corners are difficult. They are not. Until this week I was totally unaware that many quilters believe there is only one way to achieve a mitred corner. The continuous strip method – almost every quilter that ever lived has done a YouTube video on this. It might still be the best way but it relies on

a) quilting to the back first

b) either hand stitching or machine stitching neatly to the front

c) relies on you folding the fabric perfectly so that your corner is not too tight

d) some quilters still opt to cut binding on this bias for this method, others don’t, I belong to the latter for this type of binding – you are not doing a curve.

So if you are not skilful at those things, your faults are easily spotted on the front.

Flange Method

My queries were prompted by doing a flange binding for the first time. Again the continuous method is all over the internet. Few quilters can fail to be familiar with it. Yet, everyone I asked without fail seemed to ignore my particular problem. I had not started my binding with a continuous strip but with 4 separate strips, one for each border, and sewn to the back. For some reason I thought this would come to the front without problem, it does not. Maybe with a lot of effort, being brave to cut a quarter inch seam, it would work.

However I was disconcerted that quilters were happy to state that continuous strip was the only method for mitred corners and it is impossible to get a neat mitred corner any other way. With a flange yes, but with ordinary binding it is possible to use 4 strips and get perfect mitred corners.

Quilting Mitred Corners With 4 Strips

Just like mitred borders. This easy and fool proof method ensures

a) accurate corners

b) strips sewn to the front

c) hand sewn to the back

Simple cut lengths long enough to allow for the mitred corner.

Quilting Mitred Corners
Position the ruler a quarter inch beyond the last stitch

Machine sew each of the four lengths to the front of the quilt, starting and stopping one quarter inch from the end. Either work out your angle, or use a Binding Buddy Ruler. Cut your mitres. Take the two corners together, fold the quilt. Place it in position, where the last stitch was and stitch.

Quilting Mitred Corners
Ensure your ruler is straight
Folding a Mitred Corner
You can fold if you want to mark the line for quilting, but there is no need
mitred corner
mitred corner
mitred corner
Take the two edges together lined up neatly
mitred corner
Fold the quilt away from the corner
quater inch seam
Under the sewing machine, line up with your quarter inch seam
quilting mitred corners
perfect mitred corner
mitred corner
front
mitred corner
back

More Tutorials

More tutorials can be found here

Words work and images copyright Karen Platt 2019

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Festival of Quilts Countdown 4

Quilting Progress
It seems like not much to report this week but progress has been made – it’s just that I was quilting and finishing quilts rather than, for me, the most exciting part of designing new ones.

As I post this Monday morning – Two black OBW quilts are completely finished. The third one, the pink quilt, is finished on the machine quilting front. I still have the binding to do.

I also started hand stitching a few more hexagons. I’ve gone through no they do not join, to yes they do, back to no they do not. I know how to get this to work, but I am exploring a different design for them.

Behind the Scenes
Apart from quilting, taking a trade stand involves a lot more behind the scenes work. Thinking about the design of the space, how to hang quilts, pricing up products. Remembering to order everything and have ready all types of hanging etc. This takes up so much time. This week I designed and had printed the leaflets. You can see all ecourses and tutorials here

What will this week bring?
With just under three weeks to go, I am tempted to finish another quilt. The first one that I designed for the show. This was going to be my showcase so it would be nice to finish it. First task with that is cutting more hexagons or as I said above, changing the design. This is a multi-technique quilt to give your skills a workout. Also on the work schedule are all the wall hangings that need finishing and mounting. That’s a priority too. I am also working on either a BOM, Quilt challenge or something that people can sign up to. I shall be designing this next week. I am thinking about a competition too – this is a great opportunity for visitors. It’s all working out so well. Stand C5 9-12th August at the NEC.

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt 2018