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Quilting Mitred Corners Binding with Four Strips – Free Tutorial

Quilting Mitred Corners

I have just finished another quilt by quilting mitred corners. You might believe the quilting myth that mitred corners are difficult. They are not. Until this week I was totally unaware that many quilters believe there is only one way to achieve a mitred corner. The continuous strip method – almost every quilter that ever lived has done a YouTube video on this. It might still be the best way but it relies on

a) quilting to the back first

b) either hand stitching or machine stitching neatly to the front

c) relies on you folding the fabric perfectly so that your corner is not too tight

d) some quilters still opt to cut binding on this bias for this method, others don’t, I belong to the latter for this type of binding – you are not doing a curve.

So if you are not skilful at those things, your faults are easily spotted on the front.

Flange Method

My queries were prompted by doing a flange binding for the first time. Again the continuous method is all over the internet. Few quilters can fail to be familiar with it. Yet, everyone I asked without fail seemed to ignore my particular problem. I had not started my binding with a continuous strip but with 4 separate strips, one for each border, and sewn to the back. For some reason I thought this would come to the front without problem, it does not. Maybe with a lot of effort, being brave to cut a quarter inch seam, it would work.

However I was disconcerted that quilters were happy to state that continuous strip was the only method for mitred corners and it is impossible to get a neat mitred corner any other way. With a flange yes, but with ordinary binding it is possible to use 4 strips and get perfect mitred corners.

Quilting Mitred Corners With 4 Strips

Just like mitred borders. This easy and fool proof method ensures

a) accurate corners

b) strips sewn to the front

c) hand sewn to the back

Simple cut lengths long enough to allow for the mitred corner.

Quilting Mitred Corners
Position the ruler a quarter inch beyond the last stitch

Machine sew each of the four lengths to the front of the quilt, starting and stopping one quarter inch from the end. Either work out your angle, or use a Binding Buddy Ruler. Cut your mitres. Take the two corners together, fold the quilt. Place it in position, where the last stitch was and stitch.

Quilting Mitred Corners
Ensure your ruler is straight
Folding a Mitred Corner
You can fold if you want to mark the line for quilting, but there is no need
mitred corner
mitred corner
mitred corner
Take the two edges together lined up neatly
mitred corner
Fold the quilt away from the corner
quater inch seam
Under the sewing machine, line up with your quarter inch seam
quilting mitred corners
perfect mitred corner
mitred corner
front
mitred corner
back

More Tutorials

More tutorials can be found here

Words work and images copyright Karen Platt 2019

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Sketchbook Work For Quilting Ideas

Sketchbook work is great for quilting ideas. You can work out blocks, motifs, collage, save templates and all sorts of things in a sketchbook.

The templates and a leaf from my autumn quilt were sitting on my sewing table. Actually I had removed my tool box from the sewing machine because the extension table is attached. Templates and the leaf were in the toolbox tray so as not to lose them.

Then I thought, I should create a little sketchbook to keep these safe and record the quilt. Now, it is best to do this before you make the quilt, not afterwards! However, I had designed it on odd bits of scrap paper and as I went along. I wanted a record of it.

I looked for a spare sketchbook, but alas no. You’ve already seen what I was doing with junk mail envelopes a little while ago – the C5 long ones. I also had quite a few large envelopes, I think they are D-something, anyway slightly larger than A5 paper size. This size would be perfect.

My main aim was to gather together key elements of the design and to save the templates. The centre of the quilt is log-cabin based, a leaf motif and hand stitched hexagons. So these were the elements I wished to record in my sketchbook.

I glued together envelopes for sturdiness and taped them together with washi tape. That wide one with the foxes kept tearing. Hexagons and log cabin designs were created in pencil crayon. Magazine images were cut up as hexagons – this was great fun and gave me an idea for another quilt. On these pages I also created pockets for the templates. I might add more in future – fabric scraps etc from the quilt. I found some thick card to make a cover and bind it all together.

I am now starting another sketchbook for my next new quilt.

You can see the quilt tutorial here and the quilt is for sale here.

Words, work and images Karen Platt 2018

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Tutorial Cut Your Own Diamond Templates For Quilting

In this tutorial, I will teach you how to cut your own diamond templates for quilting. Many templates are too difficult to make yourself, but diamonds are a breeze. This is an easy free tutorial to enable you to make templates quickly and without too much expense.

For this tutorial you will need
1. Paper, card or mylar (these are in order of how long they last. If you want throw away templates, you can use paper, thin card can be used several times, mylar is long-lasting
2. Either a quilting ruler that has a 60° angle or a cutting mat that has a 60° angle
3. A rotary cutter or failing that scissors

For accuracy I use a cutting mat and a rotary cutter, with a solid steel ruler. My ruler is non-slip and perfect for the job. I usually use thin card.

Tutorial instructions:
1. Place your card on the cutting mat, lining it up so that it is straight.
2. Place your ruler along the 60° angle line.
3. Cut the width of the ruler. This ruler is 5cm (2″) wide. It produces a 9-patch diamond that is 15cm (6″) across when stitched together with the quarter inch seams added. You can use a narrower ruler for a smaller diamond.
4. Take your card strip and place the ruler aligned with the straight edge. Cut the width of your ruler. You have one diamond. Repeat to make more, using as much of the card as you can.
5. Place the card face down on the reverse of the fabric.
6. Allowing a quarter inch seam, cut around the card.
7. Although your card template needs to be accurate, when cutting fabric, you can cheat a little, as long as there is enough fabric to fold over and you can secure your seam.
8. Whip stitch diamonds together with right sides facing.

Words, work and images copyright Karen Platt. This tutorial is for your own personal use ONLY and is not to be copied nor distributed by any means without written permission from the author.